Air Raid Offense

 

 

Leaders of the Air Raid Offense

Did you watch the Rose Bowl Classic Oklahoma versus Georgia last night? Did you see how fast Oklahoma’s Air Raid attack moved the ball up and down the field? Do you wonder what plays Oklahoma’s Air Raid attack ran?

Today’s episode of Talking Football with Coach McKie has you covered. I interview Coach Drew Piscopo about the Air Raid attack. Couple of things I learned from the interview:

  • How to signal plays in with only two hand gestures.
  • How to practice and become great at the Four Vertical route.
  • How Mike Leach’s Air Raid differs from Hal Mumme’s Air Raid.
  • How Oklahoma uses the run more in the Air Raid.

These are only a couple of things we talk about in this podcast. We also talk about tempo and when you should mash the gas and when you should slow down.

Hope you coaches enjoy this one as much as I do.

You can get in touch with Coach Piscopo here.

Show Notes:

Free Air Raid eBook: http://www.airraiddrills.com

YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/CoachMcKie

Twitter: https://twitter.com/CoachMckieJr

Subscribe, Rate, and Review on iTunes: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/talking-football-with-coach-mckie/id1329567772?mt=2

Subscribe, Rate, and Review on Stitcher:

http://stitcher.com/s?fid=162067&refid=stpr

 

Please subscribe, rate, and leave a review. Until next time coaches, let’s continue to Master the Spread, Score Points, and Have Fun!

Read more

Mike Leach talking to Hal Mumme

Proud Parents

Oklahoma plays today in the College Playoffs and every Air Raid coach across America will be cheering them on. Why? Because this is the first time since the early 2000s that the Air Raid Offense has been on the national stage.

Yet, many coaches don’t know how the Air Raid Offense fits together. Coaches don’t see how certain routes are complementary to one another. How you need to run Y-Stick and Y-Corner together. Or how Mesh complements the Shallow Crossing series.

But don’t worry coaches. Because I’ve got ya’ll covered in today’s Talking Football with Coach McKie podcast. In this episode, I talk about six route concepts that complement one another. I also talk about how play callers can call the right play based on what the defense does. This allows the play caller to stop guessing what to call in the Air Raid Offense and start killing defenses.

This type of play calling is similar to the Wing-T and Flexbone offense. Yet, it is better because you are throwing the ball all over the place and scoring a bunch of points.

Show Notes:

Free Air Raid eBook: http://www.airraiddrills.com

YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/CoachMcKie

Twitter: https://twitter.com/CoachMckieJr

Subscribe, Rate, and Review on iTunes: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/talking-football-with-coach-mckie/id1329567772?mt=2

Subscribe, Rate, and Review on Stitcherhttp://stitcher.com/s?fid=162067&refid=stpr

Please subscribe, rate, and leave a review. Until next time coaches, let’s continue to Master the Spread, Score Points, and Have Fun!

Read more

Every offense has its signature play. The Flexbone offense has the Veer. The Wing-T has the Buck Sweep. The Run and Shoot as Go. What’s the Air Raid’s signature play? Y-Cross? Nope. Y-Stick? Nope. The Air Raid’s signature play is the Mesh Concept.

Don’t know what the Air Raid Mesh Concept is? Why? Have you been living under a rock for the past 20 years?

I’m kidding. I bet you have seen the Air Raid Mesh Concept ran before even if you don’t know what the Air Raid Mesh Concept is.

Air Raid Mesh 2 x 2

Air Raid Mesh Concept Ran From Standard 2 x 2 Set

This is standard way teams run the Air Raid Mesh Concept. I’ll walk you through the wide receiver’s routes.

Wide Receiver’s Routes on the Air Raid Mesh Concept Out of 2 x 2

R – You are running a 6 step out route. Do not break down and chop your feet on the out route. You will use a speed cut for this route.

Y – You are setting the depth of the Mesh. You should run this route no deeper than 6 yards. If you happen to run it under 6 yards then you are okay. Once you pass the center you will look to see whether the defense is in man or in zone. If the defense is in zone then you will settle up in the first open grass area. If the defense is in man then you will turn upfield slightly and keep running.

F – You are running a three-yard flat route. If you think you can get 10 yards then you will give a “BALL” call. If you do not get 10 yards when you give the “BALL” call then you will come out of the game.

L – You are setting the Mesh with the Y receiver. You will locate him coming out of your route and go UNDER him. You will get so close to the Y receiver that your shoulder pads will rub together. You will never, EVER, go over the top of the Y receiver. Your job is to make the Mesh happen and to make the Y receiver right. After you Mesh with the Y receiver you will look to see whether the defense is in man or in zone. If the defense is in zone then you will settle up in the first open grass area. If the defense is in man then you will turn upfield slightly and keep running.

TB – You are running a shoot route. You want to get out to the flats as fast as possible.

Quarterback’s Progression in the Air Raid Mesh Concept

The quarterback is going R to TB to L to Y to F. So it is Out, Flat, First Mesh, Second Mesh, Backside Flat.

That’s pretty easy, right?

 

Air Raid Mesh Concept From a 3 x 1 Formation

Air Raid Mesh Concept Ran From Trips

Air Raid Mesh Concept Ran From 3 x 1

Wide Receiver’s Routes on the Air Raid Mesh Concept Out of 3 x 1

R – You are running a 6 step out route. Do not break down and chop your feet on the out route. You will use a speed cut for this route.

Y – You are setting the depth of the Mesh. You should run this route no deeper than 6 yards. If you happen to run it under 6 yards then you are okay. But if you run it deeper than 6 then we will have a problem. Once you pass the center you will look to see whether the defense is in man or in zone. If the defense is in zone then you will settle up in the first open grass area. If the defense is in man then you will turn upfield slightly and keep running.

F – You are running a shoot route. You want to get to the sideline as fast as possible. On your third step you will whip your head around and look for the ball. You are the HOT if the defense brings a blitz from the three receiver side.

L – You are setting the Mesh with the Y receiver. You will locate him coming out of your route and go UNDER him. You will get so close to the Y receiver that your shoulder pads will rub together. You will never, EVER, go over the top of the Y receiver. Your job is to make the Mesh happen and to make the Y receiver right. After you Mesh with the Y receiver you will look to see whether the defense is in man or in zone. If the defense is in zone then you will settle up in the first open grass area. If the defense is in man then you will turn upfield slightly and keep running.

TB – You are running an arrow route. If you think you can get 10 yards then you will give a “BALL” call. If you do not get 10 yards when you give a “BALL” call then you will come out of the game.

Quarterback’s Progression in the Air Raid Mesh Concept

The quarterback is going R to F to L to Y to TB. So it is Out, Flat, First Mesh, Second Mesh, Backside Flat.

Notice How the Air Raid Mesh Concept Reads Are The Same For the Quarterback?

That’s what makes this route so freaking dangerous. Once the quarterback gets the progression – Out, Flat, First Mesh, Second Mesh, Back Side Flat – then you can run this concept from any formation with any motion you can think of.

The Air Raid Mesh Concept is only limited to your imagination. So go ahead, imagine the record books at your school falling because that’s what will happen once you install this incredible concept.

Caution for Those Who Want To Run the Air Raid Mesh Concept

You will need to rep the Air Raid Mesh Concept every day. That’s the golden rule that Hal Mumme gave when he talked about running the Air Raid Mesh Concept. Hal Mumme devotes five minutes a day drilling the play.

So if you want to become successful at this play, and light up the scoreboard as well as the record books, then you will have to spend five minutes a day drilling the play.

That doesn’t sound that bad, right?

Until next time coaches, let’s continue to Master the Spread, Score Points, and Have Fun!

 

Read more

 

The Air Raid Y-Cross Concept is one of the many great passing concepts within the Air Raid Offense.  I’m not alone with this feeling. Great coaches like Chip Kelly,   Mike Leach,   Hal Mumme, and Noel Mazzone feel the same way about this great Air Raid Concept.

Why?

Because it is one of the few Air Raid concepts that pairs up beautifully with play action.

Why Use Play-Action in the Air Raid?

Because you have to run the ball sometimes.Yes, I do love to throw the ball. A lot. Yet, I believe you have to keep the defense honest. Now, I know you can do that through quick screens to wide receivers, and slow screens to the running back. But the tried and true method of keeping a defense on its toes is good ‘

I know that is blasphemy to say in the Air Raid Offense, but it is true.  And yes, I know you can throw quick screens to wide receivers and slow screens to the running back, and say that’s your run game. But let’s be honest – that’s a cop out. Sometimes you are going to have to line up and run the ball down the defenses throat. Especially in high school

Which is great. Because now you can dial up the play action and really mess with the defense.

What is the Y-Cross Concept?

The Y-Cross concept is a weakside flood concept. It can be run from a million different formations, but the main two formations are the following:

Air Raid Y-Cross Concept out of a 2 x 2 Formation

Air Raid Y-Cross Concept Out Of 2 x 2

Air Raid Y-Cross Concept from a 2 x 2 set.

This is usually the first formation the Air Raid Y-Cross Concept is installed in.   The wide receiver routes are as followed:

L – 10-yard post. Your angle of departure is behind the safety. If the safety is bailing then you are still trying to get behind him.

F – 10 yard out.

Y – Crossing route 18-22 yards to the opposite hash. You must go under the Sam and over top the Mike. You can stop in grass and show hands after you go over the top of the Mike linebacker.

R – 15-yard dig. Sit in grass. Keep going if it is man.

Quarterback’s progression

Three step drop then it is L to F to Y to R.

Air Raid Y-Cross Concept out of a 3 x 1 Formation

Air Raid Y-Cross Concept out of Trips

Air Raid Y-Cross Concept from a 3×1 set.

The second way is out of 3 x 1. The wide receiver routes and quarterback’s progression change a bit:

L – 10-yard post. Your angle of departure is behind the safety. If the safety is bailing then you are still trying to get behind him.

Y – Crossing route 18-22 yards to the opposite hash. You must go under the Sam and over top the Mike. You can stop in grass and show hands after you go over the top of the Mike linebacker.

F – Bubble Screen. You are taking two steps forward then back pedaling towards the sideline.

R –  15-yard dig. Sit in grass. Keep going if it is man.

Quarterback’s progression

Three step drop then it is L to Y to R to F

That’s how most teams run the Air Raid Y-Cross Concept

Not me though. I don’t like to use this route as a straight drop back. I’m more of a fan of play-actioning this route. How do I do that?

By utilizing a two-back formation.

See, I think the Wing-T guys are on to something with utilizing motion in their offense. High school defenders can’t help to stare at the motion. Hell, I’m a coach and I sometimes get caught up in the motion.

So why not use motion in the Spread?

Air Raid Y-Cross Concept out of Two-Back Formation

 

Air Raid Y-Cross Concept from 2 x 1

Air Raid Y-Cross Concept Out of Two Back Formation

 

I put the F in the backfield in my two-back formation. The quarterback puts him in motion and hikes the ball. The offensive line will execute our play-action protection based on our Pin and Pull scheme.

I like this play-action blocking paired with the motion because it confuses the defense. The F is going to the right and the right guard is pulling to the left.This makes the linebackers’ heads spin. Which lets our guys get wide open for an easy pitch and catch opportunities.

Rules for the Wide Receiver

L – 10-yard post. Your angle of departure is behind the safety. If the safety is bailing then you are still trying to get behind him.

Y – Crossing route 18-22 yards to the opposite hash. You must go under the Sam and over top the Mike. You can stop in grass and show hands after you go over the top of the Mike linebacker.

R –  15-yard dig. Sit in grass. Keep going if it is man.

F – Swing Route. You are the ‘Oh Shit’ route. If no defender is around you and you can guarantee 10 yards then give a ‘Ball’ call.

Quarterback’s Progression

L to Y to R to F. Unless he hears a ‘Ball’ call from the F. Then that’s an automatic throw. If the ball gets picked off then it isn’t the quarterback’s fault. It’s the F’s fault.

There you go coaches. That’s how I utilize the Air Raid Y-Cross Concept within my offense. If you do anything different then please leave a comment below. And before you go, check out AirRaidDrills.com for a free eBook on three Air Raid drills you need to run in order to be successful in the Air Raid Offense.

Until next time coaches, let’s continue to Master the Spread, Score Points, and Have Fun!

Read more