Three Best Sprint Out Passing Concepts

Sprint Out Football Concept

Rolling Out is the Original Run Pass Option.

I used to be the biggest critic of Sprint Out Passing Concepts. I believe that to be a spread team you had to drop back and throw Y-Cross, Mesh, Shallow, and Four Verticals. Otherwise, you didn’t deserve to be called a of Spread Team.

That was before I had a quarterback who could run like a gazelle, had a cannon for an arm, yet couldn’t go through his progressions if his mother’s life depended on it.

So I was faced with a choice. Do I beat my head against the wall by forcing him to learn the progressions of my favorite routes, or do I let him sprint out and throw his favorite routes?

The choice was easy.

I know what you are thinking. No crap it’s an easy choice Coach McKie. Get off your high horse and put that kid in a position to be successful.

You’re absolutely right. I was on my high horse, and I thought I was better than every other coach in America because I could get this kid to read progressions.

I’m still picking the crow feathers out of my teeth.

I decided to pick three simple Sprint Out Passing Concepts that will allow my player – and my offense – to become successful. I want to share those three with you now.

Sprint Out Passing Concept Number 1 – Smash

Smash Route Ran as a Sprint Out Passing Concept

Smash Sprint Out Passing Concept

This is the first Sprint Out we install. It’s a simple 2 x 2 Sprint Out Passing Concept that gets one of our fastest guys in space. Here are the rules for the wide receivers.

Note: Every Sprint Out Passing Concept in our offense has a front side and a back side. The back side routes are always the same. This helps us go faster.

Wide Receiver Rules for our Smash Sprint Out Passing Concept

R – You are going to mandatory release outside the corner and push hard for six yards. You are trying to get that corner to turn his back and run with you. At six yards you will snap it off and sit down.

Y – You are going to release outside the defender that is head up to inside of you. You will push your route 12 yards and attack the inside hip of the safety. You are doing this because you want him to turn his back to the sidelines. Once you get to your yard mark you will break your route to the front pylon – unless we are inside the 20-yard line then the route angle is to the back pylon – looking for the ball over your inside shoulder.

F – You are sprinting to the far upright. You are doing this because you are the ‘Oh Shit’ for the quarterback if he takes off running.

L – You are taking five hard steps up the field and then sitting down. Occupy your defender. If he makes a play then you aren’t doing your job.

Quarterback’s Read on the Smash Sprint Out Passing Concept

Quarterback is reading Y to R to F to run.

Why do I like to look deep first? Because I think every play should be a touchdown play. So our mentality on our Sprint Out Passing Concept is Touchdown, First Down, Check Down, Get Down.

What can I say? I love to score points

Sprint Out Passing Concept Number 2 – Flood

Y-Sail Ran as a Sprint Out Passing Concept

Flood Sprint Out Passing Concept

This is the second Sprint Out Passing Concept we install. It’s a simple flood concept that looks similar to the Air Raid Y-Sail.

Wide Receiver Rules for our Flood Sprint Out Passing Concept

R – You are taking a mandatory outside release vertical. You are trying to beat him deep. On your seventh step, you will whip your head around and look for the quarterback. Do not be surprised if he throws a ‘Paint Ball’ at your head.

F – You are running a 15-yard out. If there is a guy head up/slightly inside of you then you will release outside. Do not release inside because the defender can jam you up and disrupt the timing of the route.

Y – You are taking a jab step to the inside before SPRINTING towards the flat. You will get no deeper than 2 yards in the flat. If you drift then you will allow the defense to cover you and the F receiver with one defender. That is not cool.

L – You are SPRINTING to the opposite upright. You are the ‘Oh Shit’ for the quarterback if he decides to run the ball.

Quarterback’s Read on the Flood Sprint Out Passing Concept

Same thing as before. Quarterback you are looking for Touchdown, First Down, Check Down, Get Down.

So the progression is R to F to Y to L.

Sprint Out Passing Concept Number 3 – Curl

Curl Flat Ran as a Sprint Out Passing Concept

Curl Sprint Out Passing Concept

This is the last Sprint Out Passing Concept we install. This Sprint Out Passing Concept is the counter to the Flood Sprint Out Passing Concept. We like to run this route when that corner is bailing.

This Sprint Out Passing Concept is also a great play to get your R/L involved in the offense.

Wide Receiver Rules for our Curl Sprint Out Passing Concept

R – You are SPRINTING for fifteen yards. Once you hit fifteen yards then you will beat the drum and throttle down. Do not come back down your stem. You do not have the option of finding grass because we don’t want you to get inside the quarterback’s field of vision. Show your hands so the quarterback knows when to throw it.

F – You are running a wheel route. You are trying to beat the corner over the R receiver. You do not have the option of stopping if you can’t beat him. Your job is to take that corner all the way to the parking lot.

Y – You are taking a jab step to the inside before SPRINTING towards the flat. You will get no deeper than 2 yards in the flat. If you drift then you will allow the defense to cover you and the F receiver with one defender. That is not cool.

L – You are SPRINTING to the opposite upright. You are the ‘Oh Shit’ for the quarterback if he decides to run the ball.

Quarterback’s Read on the Curl Sprint Out Passing Concept

Nothing changes philosophically for the quarterback. He is still thinking Touchdown, First Down, Check Down, Get Down.

So the progression for our Curl Sprint Out Passing Concept is F to R to Y to L.

That’s Our Sprint Out Passing Game

If you do anything different then please leave a comment below. I’d love to hear from you all because this is something I want to expand on. I think the Sprint Out Passing Game is something most coaches don’t want to work on because it isn’t something they don’t see on Saturday.

But I believe it can give you the edge you need in order to be successful on Friday.

Until next week Coaches, let’s continue to Master the Spread, Score Points, and Have Fun.

 

6 Comments, RSS

  1. Anonymous December 15, 2017 @ 10:39 am

    My favorite 3×1 Sprint out: #1 angle out hitch…#2 12 yd corner…#3 10 yd out

    • Coach McKie December 15, 2017 @ 10:47 pm

      Coach,

      What’s an angle out hitch? What’s your progression for the route?

  2. Jason Bulling November 18, 2017 @ 12:58 pm

    We run a 2 man “smash” with sprint out a bit different. We found that the hitch seems to get covered on the sprint. So our answer was to “whip” #1 so that he was running with the sprint out while #2 completes the hi-lo with the corner route. We’ve had great success with this variation. Additionally, we like to drag the BS #2 at about 10-12 yards, we coach him to cut his split and get into the QB’s vision ASAP!

    Thanks for your contributions!! Love your site!

    • Coach McKie December 3, 2017 @ 9:06 pm

      Coach Bulling,

      First, thank you for the kind words. It means a lot to me. And thank you also for reading my site.

      That’s a fantastic idea on the whip route instead of the corner. How often do you find the whip route coming open? Do you have the quarterback read the whip first, then the corner?

  3. Willie Howard October 13, 2017 @ 9:51 am

    Coach one of my favorite 3×1 sprint outs that I have used is a bubble by #1, seam by #2, and a 10 yard out by #3.

    I coached the QB eye the corner if he bailed throw the bubble now, if he bailed QB’s eye went to the OLB on the playside if he jumped the bubble we hit the out behind him, if he squatted take your eyes to the safety. We have hit the seam a few times, but it doesn’t happen very often

    • Coach McKie October 22, 2017 @ 6:30 pm

      Coach Howard,

      Thank you for taking time out of your day to read my blog. It means a lot to me that you would take time out of your day to do this.

      That’s a great concept. How often do you run it in a game? Have you ever had a problem with the corner messing around with your quarterback? Or does the play happen so fast that the corner gives away his intention quick?

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